Research

Muslim Everyday Life and digital Media Practices in Germany

In my postdoctoral research project I focus on Muslim everyday life and digital media practices in Germany. Through digital ethnography, fieldwork in different ‘off-line’ as well as ‘online’ contexts, I explore dynamics and practices of connecting and excluding in different Muslim communities in Germany and the German-speaking public sphere.

New spheres of Muslim activism and participation as well as Anti-Muslim racism and the Securitisation of Islam in Germany, are important issues in this research. I explore these themes through a focus on everyday experiences.

In this context I investigate social, visual, and digital practices, using digital and experimental ethnography and digital curatorial strategies for the co-creation of knowledge.

In this project I focus particularly on the everyday curating of social media profiles, and additionally take part in a collaborative team ethnographic approach on Instagram.

Political Violence, Religion, and Artistic Practices

As part of the project “Jihadism on the Internet”, I have been working at the intersection of political violence, religion, and artistic practices. I have been informed by critical and decolonial perspectives in this field.

Together with Larissa-Diana Fuhrmann I curated the ongoing digital platform reCLAIM: art against political violence and organized events surrounding the platform.

Currently, I’m preparing a co-edited volume (together with Robert Dörre and Christoph Günther) on “Disentangling Jihad, Political Violence, and Media” with Edinburgh University Press that is based on the symposium Notions of Jihad Reconsidered.

This work also builds on the co-edited book Jihadi Audiovisuality and its Entanglements and the co-authored article on Re-enacting violence (2020) where we explored the appropriations of IS decapitation videos and sounds by very different kinds of actors in contested digital public spheres.

Social Media in Transnational Everyday Life

My book on social media in transnational everyday life (Social Media im transnationalen Alltag, 2020, transcript Publisher) is based on my PhD research, a multi-sited media ethnography in Berlin, Dakar and ‘online’.

The book analyzes media practices and transnational social relationships across multiple media like videos, photography, mobile phones, Skype, or Facebook, and starts out with a focus on transnational religious and life-cycle celebrations like weddings or the “Magal de Touba”. Through the perspective on images that Senegalese are making and circulating of themselves the book also offers alternative interpretations to images of migration and refugees that dominate journalistic media. The recently published articles In/Visible Images of Mobility (2021), Expanding the Family Frame (2021), and the photo-essay Circulating Family Images (2020) additionally reflect on my PhD research through the lens of my embodied media and image practices and family involvement. 

Ethics in (Digital) Ethnography & Image Ethics

In recent years, exploring and taking serious ethical challenges of my research has become central to my work. Together with Larissa-Diana Fuhrmann I focused on the particular ethical challenges in digital ethnography that relate to the securitization of Islam.

A dedicated section on ethical challenges of empirically grounded research on Jihadism in the co-edited volume Jihadi Audiovisuality and its Entanglements further reflects this research focus as does the co-edited special section and its introduction Dark Ethnography? Encountering the ‘Uncomfortable Other’ in Ethnographic Research, that focuses on ethical dilemma situations and methodological challenges of ethnographic research in militant religio-political and far-right contexts. In another strand on ethical challenges, I focus on images of violence and ethical perspectives in journalistic images, e.g. in an article that I wrote together with Robert Dörre and Christoph Günther for the exhibition catalogue Mindbombs. Visual Cultures of Political Violence

Digital & Visual Methods

More coming soon!

(Post-)Migration, Mobility and Transnationalism